Job Smeets was a star student at Design Academy Eidhoven when he graduated in 1996. Belgian in origin, he went on to form a studio in the Netherlands, Studio Job, with partner Nynke Tynagel and together they built an extraordinary studio, one that primarily creates one off pieces, work that has has been featured in over 400 exhibitions worldwide. The ah ha moment came when they went to The Milan Furniture Fair and realized that many of the prototypes created would remain just that, prototypes. But taken individually, they could easily stand alone as exceptional objects, art pieces in fact. This set the foundation for what Studio Job would become, a design studio like none other, and one that combines ‚Äútraditional and modern techniques to create once in a lifetime objects.”

Job Smeets:
My question was always how can design be so expressive that it doesn’t need to be called art. I didn’t really care whether it was art or design. It was just more about the expression and freedom, freedom of speech. But in certain fields, it’s becoming very difficult now to even talk about it while it’s such a basic right.

Arkitektura:
That’s designer, Job Smeets of Studio Job. I think that’s how it’s pronounced. It looks like job. And this is Design in Mind, a podcast series from Arkitektura, which has been a hub for international designers and brands in America for over three decades. My name is Arkitektura and Design in Mind candidly explores the lives and work of some of the most inspiring designers and design thinkers from around the world.

Job Smeets was a star student at Design Academy, Eindhoven, when he graduated in 1996. Belgian and origin, he went on to form a studio in the Netherlands, Studio Job, with partner Nynke Tynagel, and together they built an extraordinary studio. One that primarily creates one-off pieces; work that has been featured in over 400 exhibitions worldwide. The aha moment came when they went to the Milan Furniture Fair and realized that many of the prototypes created would remain just that, prototypes. But taken individually, they could easily stand alone as exceptional objects, art pieces, in fact.

This set the foundation for what Studio Job would become; a design studio like none other, and one that combines traditional and modern techniques to create once in a lifetime objects. Job’s world is immersed in art and design, his own and that of others, but he didn’t grow up in a culture of design. In fact, his upbringing was erratic with his family moving regularly from one place to another following a job or an inclination. It may be why his work is so radical, divergent, vast, and outspoken. Just go to the website, Studio dash Job, J-O-B, dot com, and the cursor that transforms from the index finger to the middle finger gives a window into the attitude, nonconformist and utterly unique.

We spoke with the Job Smeets from his home, his cat and baby may be heard in the background. And several times the call dropped. These were early COVID days when we were still trying to find our way, but the candor of our conversation was very much there. Stay tuned.

Job Smeets:
I was like a lucky bird who went to a very avant-garde ’90s Paris where there were no rules. And I came back to Holland, which is the country of rules. And I was able to say, “Fuck you, you with your rules. I do whatever I want.” And that’s freedom. It’s not so that I said that “fuck you” very verbally that way. It was a very long, slow process of very intense thinking and insecurity and all these and also depressions. And then you discover something and I think next to your talent, discovery is very important, especially in design because everything was still Modernism. It was still about the functionality and about trying to produce for a certain retail price so a lot of people could enjoy it. All that kind of…

In that time in the ’90s it was all about the Milan Industrial Furniture Fair. Every year you would see all these new prototypes of the fancy Italian and English producers, but then later on in the year, you would never see them back in the shops anymore. So I wondered what happened to all these beautiful prototypes that were produced for those fairs? And then I discovered that they were just models, prototypes, and if they were not immediately picked up by the market, let’s say the design market, they would just stay prototypes or they would stay… So they would become unique pieces. And then I thought, but when it’s a unique piece it’s an art piece.

And then a thought, when it’s an art piece, why should it look like an industrial injection molded piece when it’s a unique piece? And then I thought, okay, it doesn’t need to be so industrial because it’s a unique piece. It can also be made out of bronze, which is a material come from art. And then it doesn’t need to be functional anymore. And it still can be designed. So my question was always how can design be so expressive that it doesn’t need to be called art? I didn’t really care whether it was art or design. It was just more about the expression and freedom, freedom of speech. But in certain fields, it’s is becoming a very difficult now to even talk about it while it’s such a basic right. You know, if you look back even at the 16th century where ladies would be topless on paintings, squeezing their boobs and milk would come out and to be swallowed by a baby Jesus, you know, 14th century paintings. I tried to do that now. So it’s not that we lost a lot, but we created a lot of dogmas.

Arkitektura:
Do you still feel that sense of freedom?

Job Smeets:
Yes, in my work, yes. And even if you see it now in the perspective of this total world to change this traumatic for us all, but it’s very inspiring for the work. What’s happening now in politics and the combination of COVID and the ridiculousness of seeing that whole movie that we played in Europe, in the twenties and thirties, seeing it fucking coming back in America, it’s like the saddest, saddest thing. But it’s very beautiful for the work. You can hear the cat constantly. I’m sorry.

Arkitektura:
That’s okay. I don’t mind hearing the cat. I mean, this is our current… This is what it is now.

Job Smeets:
Yeah. But that’s lovely. Now, finally, we can be imperfect. Can you imagine?

Arkitektura:
Now but you allow yourself to be imperfect. You allow yourself to be exactly who you are. You’re not trying to be perfect. Look at your work. I mean, it’s so organic. It doesn’t feel like it’s trying… I mean, on the other hand, actually, I do think that it’s interesting how the alignment between what you see in your mind and what’s created is so important to you.

Job Smeets:
Yeah. Because that’s the short distance. So that’s the trying to be as close to the source as possible to the thought. Yes.

I didn’t really care whether it was art or design. It was just more about the expression and freedom, freedom of speech.

Arkitektura:
It’s very hard though. I mean, it’s really…

Job Smeets:
Yeah. It’s a matter of being able to make good, to being able to express yourself in the right way. So especially when it comes to design or three dimensional shape it’s handy when you’re a good drawer. When you can express yourself through your hands with a pen the same as you can do with your vocabulary, that’s very handy. So it’s a double language, but more than 20 years of daily practicing it turns me into a kind of a, not a professional, but more like a fit. I can kind of draw what I imagine. So my head and my hand go well together. I don’t know about the rest to be honest though, Tania.

Arkitektura:
So you’re an only child. I’m an only child too.

Job Smeets:
It’s heavy, you know, just to be on the sound a little bit almost, I don’t know. I don’t know. Do you have children?

Arkitektura:
I do. I have one child.

Job Smeets:
How was it to get your first child? Because I didn’t have a brother or sister. So that whole emotion, that feeling, that you really belonged to something for the first time really. And I’m 50. So I got my first childhood when I’m 50. So I was 50 years alone and then all of a sudden there comes the tsunami called love. And there’s the child, it’s like, wow. It’s like-

Arkitektura:
You know, last night I was in bed with my daughter, she’s eight, and in that moment I was telling her how my whole heart and body just felt like it was expanding. Like, I felt like it was exploding because my love for her was so strong. I almost wanted to just consume her. I can’t describe it. It was just so strong.

Job Smeets:
I’m so happy that that doesn’t become less when they get older. I want to eat Elvis everyday a few times. I even have a folk that I already put him in the oven.

Arkitektura:
It’s even more. It grows even more because they become these people that you connect with and that you discover and you support.

Job Smeets:
I can’t wait, Tania. I hope I have a few more years to go, so I can see him grow up a little bit. It will be amazing.

Arkitektura:
Of course, you have many more years to go. And I think what’s exciting for him is that he’s going to see all these other things that you’ve created.

Job Smeets:
I hope it’s not going to be a burden for him. So I’m sometimes worried about that. But I think Rebecca is on that case, so that will be fine. I mean, it’s more likely he will become a doctor, I think, because the whole Sharkey family only doctors, so, you know.

Arkitektura:
Well maybe, but it will be something that will deeply inspire him. I think, fundamentally, what will inspire him and what’s the most important is that he will be inspired to allow himself to not be suppressed. And be who he truly is. And that’s the only gift we can give to our children is really to give them the freedom to be who they are.

Job Smeets:
And then it’s taken away by the country immediately, by the way we live. Isn’t it so like that? That everything changed for good the last six months, come on.

Arkitektura:
Yeah. Everything has changed in the last six months, but I believe that there must be something on the other side that we can’t see yet. So you had said, just talking about, because this is connected to talking about your son and will he feel the pressure of your success? But I think in a way our children can make us feel both very mortal and immortal because they continue on beyond us. And you were saying that your works also can make you feel immortal.

Job Smeets:
Well, I used to think that that’s why maybe an artist wants to create a thing. First of all, many artists, so not all artists, will be self-centered and in that way, creating something is yourself a little bit immortal, right? I don’t know what happen now, since I have Elvis, to that, but maybe artistically is the same. It still stays the same, of course. Yeah. And that’s also part of the idea that archeologic find, somebody would dig up a Studio Job bronze piece in 5,000 years somewhere in the ground inspired me to start to work in that super strong material, bronze, which survives everything. Yeah.

Arkitektura:
Yeah. I’d love that notion of… The bronze was a turning point, I think, for sure, this notion that you could use bronze-

Job Smeets:
In design. I mean, now you see it more often. I mean also because the galleries noticed, okay, a bronze piece makes money because it’s bronzed and a lot of stuff is more expensive. But when I started doing it in ’98, there was no soul whoever did it, I think. And it doesn’t really matter whether I introduce it or not, but my reason was not to create some kind of uber value, let’s say some kind of [inaudible 00:13:10] value because it’s made out of bronze and that’s precious. And that’s why it’s expensive. For me is was much more that archeologic kind of approach next to the fact that I wanted to see how it would look when you would put materials strictly coming from art into a modern design area.

Arkitektura:
Well, what this reminds me of is when you look at the body of your work, one of the things that I find really interesting about it and really powerful about it is that it brings together seemingly contradictory… Or not contradictory, but movements and inspirations that you wouldn’t necessarily put together. I mean, I think, because you’re saying, talking about archeology and that reminds me of history and then reminds me of the history of movement and art and someone had asked you like, “What’s your inspirations?” Which I never like that question because there was just this beautiful fog resting on this plant outside. And I thought, “Oh my gosh, that’s so beautiful.” And so in that moment, I’m sure I was inspired just as much as I might be inspired by this Liza Lou sculpture at the Whitney,

Job Smeets:
No, but you have the essence and you translate it in your thing and the things you do and I translate it into things I do. Everybody basically does the same. It’s trying to find your talent and try to express your talent in your work or in your life or in your social life or in your playing games or I don’t know. I think that everybody, if there will be more… It would be nice for people to discover their talent always in any way. Yeah.

Arkitektura:
I mean, if I were listening to this as a young designer or someone that was trying to discover or understand themselves better and what their place is in the world, I would say, “Well, how do I do that? How do I discover my talents?”

Job Smeets:
Oh my God, that’s very hard and also their chances are so slim. You know, it’s very hard to only try to listen to yourself and not to get influenced by people you find much more sexy than you are yourself.

Arkitektura:
And probably when you actually find out who they are, they’ve had the same kind of-

Job Smeets:
Exactly. We get each other. That’s what I totally mean. You know, you spend your life looking up to people who you would like to be. It doesn’t need to be a famous person. It can also be a cool guy at the office or behind the bar, or I don’t know, like a personality that you would like to be. And then you discover later that they want to be your personality. It’s a mouse and cat game in that way. But I believe discovering yourself as the only way. It’s an attitude. It’s so weird but the moment I had the feeling that I could do it, I never went back and I never had any moment of doubt when it comes to inspiration. I’m not saying that everything I do is genius, but I’m saying that I never have no inspiration. And that’s purely because of that sense of freedom.

Arkitektura:
Were your parents surprised by this part of you that, you know, what did they think?

Job Smeets:
My mother says, “Oh, you have it for me. He has it for me.” And my father says, “No, he has it from me.” I don’t know. I don’t know. I mean, my parents are hard workers and they’re super sweet and I love them. And my mother is a nutcase and my father is very crafty. So maybe it’s a mix. I don’t know. Should be a mix. I think also because I didn’t have the most easy youth, I think it has to do with that. So, you’re kind of on your own a lot. So you create your own little atmosphere. And then I locked up that atmosphere during my teenage years, and then I opened it again when I was 24. And then there was so much stuff in there from there on, and it was not easy.

I mean, Jesus Christ, so difficult to build a company and what I do, but, you know, I even dare to say that I think I didn’t even did my best work yet. So it’s still… Because what is important also, when you get older you lose your naivety. I mean, they call it when you’re young, you’re naive, you can allow things that if you will do them when you’re 50, you look like a nutcase. So, you have to find compensation for the losses.

Arkitektura:
Yeah, absolutely. So when you say, I mean, you’re saying that your childhood was difficult, was it the loneliness? Was it the fact that you didn’t have many friends? I know what that’s like. I didn’t have any friends either.

Job Smeets:
Yeah. Well, you’re a lonely child, too, and I don’t know how you were, when you at least live at one spot for 10 years, then you can develop some friendships. But I moved 12 times in my first 17 years. So it’s quite weird. And it all depends on also how you cope with it, of course. So I think I’ll always let the, how do you call it? The doors of emotions open very much. And I always kept the doors of pragmaticism a little bit closed.
Arkitektura:    So you moved 12 times because that was what your mom wanted?
Job Smeets:    Yeah, and my mom was always had a reason to… She is still a little bit nomadic. So, yeah. And I also, I’m now 50 and I also find myself traveling constantly. The only thing I don’t do is switch houses constantly, you know, buy and sell houses constantly. That’s what I don’t do, because I don’t think you need homes. You need a home. Yeah.

Arkitektura:
Well, no. I mean, it was funny because when I was trying to make sure that I had the right time, I thought, Okay, well, the address is in London, I think, but he has this place in Milan, but then, you know, it says Belgian, but then he’s doing something in the Netherlands.”
Job Smeets:    The moving thing I still have, although I don’t like it, but I still have it, but I try to… Intend to keep them instead of selling them and losing them. That’s a little bit what I try not. So I have a few places where I can feel at home.

Arkitektura:
What makes you feel at home?

Job Smeets:
Oh, I don’t know. Right now, I feel at home at the countryside because I don’t want to be in the city now because I want to breathe. And I think it’s a little bit narrow now in the cities. It’s the first time that the city is not sexy, which is very real, very new also to all of us.

Arkitektura:
So you said that artists and designers in our era, they can’t be ideological anymore. Why do you think being ideological is important?

Job Smeets:
Look at the world. That’s the best answer I can give to you. I mean, you know, look in the newspaper right now. I cannot illustrate you a better example of that is support to be ideological right now. I think everybody should be ideological right now. And that’s hopefully one of the things we will learn from this crazy COVID situation, that it’s important to stay ideological and to stay near yourself.

Arkitektura:
I was interviewing someone that was talking about how much he questions what he does, even though he’s very successful. I was asking him, how does he push through those moments of really questioning himself? And one of the reasons it came up was because right now we’re in this crisis and people are saying, “Well, how am I contributing?” And I guess my question is, in and around design and art, although I have my answer for this, how does it bring value?

Job Smeets:
Wow. Well, you know, I’ve been asking myself that question from the day I started in doing design because I still don’t really understand how design can be really valuable. And it’s the cross I have to bear. So I always play with that aspect. And I think, in my work, that that aspect of being, let’s say, unimportant created some kind of humor or maybe, I don’t like the word cynicism, maybe sarcasm, personal sarcasm to myself that makes the work maybe a little bit poetic. And when it’s poetry, it fucking has a lot of views.

So at one day, I picked out to become a fucking designer. I didn’t know anything about it. The only thing I knew is that my father could make a nice drawing and he had some antique furniture. And then I became a designer with my stupid hat studied for five years, thought, okay, now I’m a designer. You know, now you have to deal with it because the government paid you this, not the government, but the people supported you to do this study. Now you have to deal with it. And then you basically are a designed while you don’t want to be a designer because it’s so ridiculous to be a designer in this ridiculous, material world.

But at the same, that’s a big inspiration. And also that was the inspiration to start a work in bronze, because if you do a bronze piece, you only do one or you do two or you do four, but at least nobody will throw away. So it’s a little bit like a reaction against companies like Ikea, or, you know, if you would say, McDonald’s is kind of the same. I mean, I’m not saying that they’re wrong and everybody should do whatever they want, but trying to be as less as designer as possible, but you are a designer or an artist, right? To be an artist is less impossible, but you are an artist trying to deal with that. The best way you can do it is to show it in the work.

Arkitektura:
Why do you think you’ve been so successful?

Job Smeets:
First of all, I question myself, whether I am from the outside, it might look that I am kind of the lucky bird who won that one golden bar, that one golden ticket of being the artist in design and actually making a living with it. The happy few, that’s a Willy Wonka thing, nearly. But on the other hand, I had to fight so hard for it that I also think… When I started everybody thought I was the worst of the worst. I was a bad designer, a bad artists, especially the Dutch. They hated me because I was totally not following their path of functionalism and production, methodism and modernism. I was always doing the opposite. And I think maybe that’s because I had that totally different approach than the rest, in the end, after 20 years, it paid off and now they see it finally accepted and respected.

Arkitektura:
So perseverance, stubbornness, trust.

Job Smeets:
The beginning was awful. Insecurity, Tania, I’m telling you about that first only-child thing. I was so frustrated by, I still can remember that I was bullied at high schools so much that I always thought, “You will fucking wait and see. I’ll come back.” In the beginning it was pure, how do you call it when you’re… Revenge. And then the revenge becomes serious and beautiful and you learn about your field. And then it turns slowly into a body of work. It changed my life forever, forever and ever. And it’s so awful to have that trauma already when you’re so young. It’s so weird.

Arkitektura:
I think sometimes those hardships, yes, it’s true, sometimes you don’t make it, but then sometimes you really do. And you push through those maybe out of a desire to beat that, to overcome that.

Job Smeets:
I think so. I think my ambition was, and that’s maybe one reason, but I think especially my ambition in the first 15 years were really to push my opinions and try to make them respected by more people. It’s really weird. I mean, not in a communication way because I just did what I wanted to, but I noticed all of a sudden, when people started to collect your stuff, and those were people who never knew you. So they were not people from Holland, they were not people from your old school. They were just people from the US or from Italy, all of a sudden started to collect my stuff. I was like, okay. So, those are the tiny success moments-

Arkitektura:
Oh, well huge success moments. I don’t think they’re tiny at all. I mean, especially for someone like you, because the work is so you. It’s not like some… I mean, I love my Expedit Ikea. And my husband’s a furniture maker so everything is unique in our house, but we do have an Expedit and I think, okay, well, hundreds of thousands of other people have this, but I didn’t collect it because… I don’t know who the designer is of that. But if I collected something of yours, I would actually be bringing you into my home. You would be living in my house with me.

Job Smeets:
Yes and that’s sometimes scary, too, for collectors, I must say. But not scary, but it’s prominent. It’s not a reason to not make them.

Arkitektura:
Yes. But I think it’s a beautiful thing for someone in America that you don’t know, especially when this first started happening for you, to say, “Wow, the way you see the world and manifest it in an object is something I want near me at all times.” It’s an amazing thing to have that experience as a creative. It’s rare though.

Job Smeets:
Yes. Oh, and it is. I mean, but the idea of expressing your feelings in an object that could be used or could possibly be used or that is coming from a field of use, to really try to make it more lyrical. That’s very… When I sketched the bananas in 2014 and I was really feeling, I was just separated to my ex and everything was shit and I felt like design was all bullshit and I made the banana. It also helped me again to get out of that valley. But it’s more important is that you are like a writer a little bit, but then you write with three dimensional objects instead of words. It’s a vocabulary.

Arkitektura:
So why did the banana do that? Like, what was it about the banana that allowed you to-

Job Smeets:
It’s always a translation of how you feel, I think. You cannot do a banana lamp when you feel very poetic or dreamy. You do a banana lamp when you feel cynical or satirical or when you had enough of it or something. It’s a very “fuck you” piece, right? And on the other hand, you can do a piece that is overloaded by only emotion. Like the other day or a few months ago, I did a bronze painting, like a canvas. The whole canvas and the whole painting is casted in bronze and I did the painting but then in bronze. That’s all about emotions, but it’s so nice then that it can come together in an interior or in the space and still be together there.

And also explain that we are all satirical and emotional and we’re all just human with all our emotions and all our difficulties and all our fears. And it’s interesting that I kind of found a way to express those very primarily primer emotions into shapes and forms and icons and bananas and clocks. I don’t know why it happened but it happened. After a while you can’t deny it yourself anymore. When I look at my portfolio and see all these things, in the end I can see a line in those things and I can see different, let’s say, levels that run next to each other already from the early 20th century on. From the early… When I just started. I still work on the same collections as I did 20 years ago. And they are just extending. So it’s nice to be able also to not only make sad songs, but also make happy songs and funny songs and birthday songs and…

Arkitektura:
And for those to fluidly live side by side. And what it also reminds me of is that, now that you’ve had Elvis, you’re going to see now that these initial characters that you see in him of, Rebecca was saying, curious about everything going everywhere. Those are not just like, “Oh, it’s just because he’s a baby.” It’s like that’s who he will be. Of course we change.

But there are certain fundamental things that, you know, no matter how much time has passed, it’s just a refinement of something that was always there. And so, you know, you were saying that when you look at things that you were doing in the late ’90s to now, you really can see the connection. And of course, because if you were being true to yourself then, and you’ve continued to be, then the connection must be there.

Job Smeets:
Yeah. And it evolves. It’s the same story [inaudible 00:33:15]. It’s a life. Yeah, I’m very curious about it. I’m very, very curious about it. And I think, definitely think, that Elvis changed my life. And obviously also COVID shook us all up. So I’m very curious what’s going to happen upcoming time. You know, when designers become even less important now.

Arkitektura:
I don’t know, or more important.

Job Smeets:
Well, the good thing about it is because finally we can stay home and our most expensive purchase, our house, I don’t mortgage. We can finely enjoy it instead of going in the traffic every day to sit in front of a screen in an office somewhere. The digital highways that we already built for 20 years, but never really used. So in a way, we are pushed into a course set into a… That would have taken, otherwise, maybe another 10 years. So it’s-

Arkitektura:
And it’s not just our house. It’s like all the things around us, you know? In my house it’s, Phillip is my husband, he makes furniture, so there’s all of his furniture. And then his sister’s a ceramicist. So there’s all of her ceramics. And then there’s things that… His other sister’s textile designer. So there’s her things. And then there’s paintings that friends have made. It’s all these things that have accrued so much meaning for us that we get to really-

Job Smeets:
That’s exactly what I was saying. That is also what will come up now, the upcoming years that the local influences will be huge again. And the emotional attachment of where you got something from, the souvenir, those kinds of things will be much more important again. And also because we are at home more, we will probably give more attention to our interiors. Yes.

Arkitektura:
You know, it’s really interesting how, because of Zoom and because of this, I know you can’t see me, but I’m looking right into your eyes, because of Zoom and because of this whole COVID, my interviews now are like two and a half hours. Whereas they used to be just like one hour, it’d be done, but people were in our homes. We’re more comfortable. People want to talk anyways. It’s fascinating. But my question is, since we don’t know what’s on the other side of this crazy time, what do you hope is on the other side?

Job Smeets:
Wow. In my life I do love the local-ty of everything. I love it that my auntie knits a cushion for me and that the family is there together again and all these things. I mean, all these things that I miss I never had. But the idea, the romantic idea of that we are living together in the village and we help each other. And next to that, we have that digital connection to the world. And we can talk to anyone and think any idea and plug everything. That combination I really like.

Arkitektura:
I wish I was-

Job Smeets:
So what was the name they always call you Tania ania?

Arkitektura:
How did they tease me? Let’s see. I can’t remember how they messed with my name, but they called me everything. I was fat. I was ugly. I was this. I was that. Screw them, though.

Job Smeets:
I was Job [foreign language 00:36:45], which means Job eggshell. And then one time I moved and even on the other school, they already heard that they will call me that name in that former school and they just proceeded to that. I was like, “Fuck you, one day I will come in a red Ferrari and I will say to you guys, ‘Screw you.'” That’s the kind of thing you think when you’re 11, right? Yeah. But you know what? I’m very honored that you called out to me to talk about this.

Arkitektura:
It’s very nice of you to say that because I was really touched that you said yes to the interview and I was going to ask you, do you just say yes to every interview? And when I looked at that question, I thought, “Tania, why are you asking that? You don’t think that you’re valuable enough to interview this person? See how that little thing from your childhood still comes through?”

Job Smeets:
That’s exactly. That’s, wow, that’s a smart one. Okay. That’s a good way to say goodbye to each other. As long as we know this from each other, everything will be fine.

Arkitektura:
Yes. As long as we know that we were both excited and felt valued in speaking with each other, that’s great.

Job Smeets:
Yeah. Thank you so much. And God bless you and take good care of the upcoming weeks.

Arkitektura:
I will. You too. And good luck with Elvis.

Job Smeets:
I don’t know how to… I just do this.

That was designer Job Smeets of Studio Job, an artist amongst the prestigious roster of creative at Carpenter’s Workshop Gallery. Job Smeets work can be seen both there and on his eponymous website, Studio dash Job, J-O-B, dot com. Design in Mind is a podcast series from Arkitektura. Based in San Francisco, Arkitektura curates the best design from around the world and makes it accessible through its retail spaces, live events, and this very podcast. Design in Mind is Arkitektura’s way of honoring the life and work of some of the best designers today and celebrating the magic and beauty of design and design thinking. Design in Mind is produced for Arkitektura by Sound Made Public. I’m your host, Arkitektura. To hear more, please visit arksf.com or go to iTunes and subscribe to Design in Mind, rate the show, tell us what you think. Thank you so much for listening.

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