Arkitektura Assembly:  Bringing together the world of Design

DESIGN IN MIND: Neri & Hu

Neri & Hu cannot be pinned down. From architecture to objects, interiors to installations, Neri & Hu are one of the most well respected designers today. But what may be most fascinating is that they built their business while building their family of three children. We sat down with them to discuss what is it that they love about each other, how their roles change in work and at home and what they value the most.

View collection from Neri & Hu here.

Rossana Hu:
We always try to engage culture. You know, because objects are concrete form and material and yet they in an abstract way solidify thoughts and philosophy.

Arkitektura:
That’s Rossana Hu of the dynamic duo Neri&Hu. This is Design in Mind, a podcast series from Arkitektura, which has been a hub international designers and design brands in America for over three decades. My name is Tania Ketenjian and Design in Mind candidly explores the lives and works of some of the most inspiring designers and design thinkers from around the world. Again, Neri&Hu.

Lyndon Neri:
Both Rossana and I, we’re very taken by this quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, a French philosopher. He says, “We do not aspire to be eternal beings. We only hope that things do not lose its meaning.” I think all the things we do is not so much stylistic, the projects we’re working on be it Waterhouse or Sulwhasoo. Stylistic is so different, but the essence of it, there’s always meaning to everything we do.

Arkitektura:
Neri&Hu’s work cannot be pinned down. They are architects, industrial designers, interior designers. They design furniture and objects from cutlery to lighting. Their main offices are based in Shanghai and London, but their work can be seen all over the world. In this interview, we take a step back from their work and talk about how they met, what they each bring to the table as a couple both at work and at home, and what it was like to raise three children while developing their international design practice.

Lyndon Neri:
We actually met before Berkeley. We did. I was more her sister’s friend. Rossana thought I was a lot older.

Rossana Hu:
He acted a lot older. Like an adult. I was a teenager and he was this adult, but we met at church.

Lyndon Neri:
I believe you were 12. She was 12 and I was 15. You know at that time 12 and 15 there’s really a big disparity. It’s not as close as three years would indicate. I was more her sister’s friend, but we started to get to know each other when she applied for architecture school. She got into architecture school at Berkeley and her sister had asked her, “Well, Rossana, Lyndon’s already at Berkeley, rising senior. You might want to ask him whether Berkeley’s the right school.” She had got into other schools as well. Naturally I had an ulterior motive, so I made sure.

When I saw her for the first time when I was 15 and she was 12, I already took interest in her, but you don’t say anything at that age. She couldn’t recognize between me and my brother, but I did. I had this …

Rossana Hu:
I truly doubt it. I think he’s making it up.

Lyndon Neri:
I did. I did. I’m not making it up. You can ask my brother.

Arkitektura:
I believe it.

Lyndon Neri:
I did. I said, “I want to be with that girl at that time,” but it was just not appropriate. This was a perfect opportunity when her sister had asked her to come. Naturally I brought my portfolio. I was trying in many ways showing off what architecture could potentially be.

Arkitektura:
Amazing. There are these sparks that happen, right, from meeting someone and it is for real because your whole lives are so intertwined. Do you remember Lyndon from that age? She has to say yes.

Rossana Hu:
I remember him as sort of a pair with his brother because we were in the same church youth group. We would probably see each other every weekend. He at the time to me looked very similar to his older brother and I could never tell the difference between the Neri brothers. That was a joke is like every time I see one of them I would say, “So which one are you? The older? The younger?”

Arkitektura:
Where’s your brother now?

Lyndon Neri:
He’s here actually. He’s in California.

Arkitektura:
Really? You could have potentially stayed here, but you moved onto Harvard.

Lyndon Neri:
Yeah. After Berkeley, I worked here for two years. I had applied to a number of schools in the East Coast. At that time, if you graduated from Berkeley architecture school, those graduate school in the East were the natural places or people tend to apply to those schools. I applied to schools like Princeton, Yale and Harvard. Obviously Rafael Moneo was at the GSD at that time. I had always wanted to study under him, so it was a no brainer when I got in.

Arkitektura:
What was it Rafael’s work that you were so attracted to and do you still feel inspired by him?

Lyndon Neri:
Oh, very much so. In fact, I’m still very much intimidated by him. I still very much needing his approval. There’s a certain conviction in what he does and his passion for architecture, his appreciation for authenticity and understanding tectonics were really crucial. It’s not just about beautiful drawing. It’s about how things are built and how its built beautifully and spatially. The human experience was very important to him. I learned a lot because coming from Berkeley you were trained to be an amazing presenter. You can have beautiful presentation, but at the end of the day, some of the sectional qualities might not necessarily be as important. Going to the GSD, that was transformative because that was crucial and important.

If you do not understand spaces or if you don’t explore those issues and how tectonic expresses certain ideas or your ideology, then you’ll have a hard time. I’m not saying that’s the only way to do architecture, but certainly that was one in which Rafael believed in it strongly.

Arkitektura:
Well, a couple of things. Those terms that you used, it sounds like they’re a lot of the things that you as a practice believe in as well. Could you speak to that Rossana? I mean the notion that it’s not about beautiful drawings, the importance of the way in which we move through a space, the inherent qualities of the space. I think the hotel that’s often referred to in your work is completely revolutionary. It’s amazing how attractive it is. The other thing I wanted to say is that it’s interesting to be so successful and still be intimidated. I think that’s important for people to hear that. Rossana, can you speak to those qualities?

Rossana Hu:
What Lyndon talked about in terms of the spatial quality of architecture and objects is crucial for Neri&Hu. I think this idea and passion and obsession for the experience of a body moving through space stems from our education, both from Berkeley and then later on Lyndon’s experience at the GSD and then mine from Princeton.

Arkitektura:
You certainly constantly explore. I mean looking at the breath of the work from objects to furniture, to interiors.

Lyndon Neri:
Architecture.

Arkitektura:
Yeah. I mean it’s expansive. I couldn’t actually … I was amazed.

Lyndon Neri:
Both Rossana and I, we’re very taken by this quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, a french philosopher. He says, “We do not aspire to be eternal beings. We only hope that things do not lose its meaning.” People often ask us, “How do you do it?” When we look back at the breath of the work that we’ve done the last 12 years, we’re surprised as well. We’re kind of baffled by them. Wow, we’re really grateful that God has given us this platform, this platform in which we can experiment and play. We’re mindful of that and we’re very interested in a lot of things be it graphics, be it product design, be it interiors, be it architecture, be it master planning. Rossana always said something that resonated well with me.

Rossana said, “If we’re no longer significant in the things we do, we should step away. We should be humble enough. If we can’t contribute anymore, we should be humble enough to step away and let other people do it.” I think that’s really correct and honest and true. We’re constantly checking ourselves and saying, “If we’re not as good as that, then let other people do it.”

Arkitektura:
Sometimes you see musicians who continue to play when it’s obvious that their time … Well, it’s not obvious that their time is up, but it’s okay for it to be up. It’s okay for them to move on. I think it takes a lot of strength to do that and a lot of self-awareness. Lyndon, you said you’ve always been in love with Rossana and it is a beautiful thing to say. I’m curious what it is that you love so much about her.

Lyndon Neri:
It’s interesting you should say that because my father, we’ll refer to him quite a bit because he’s a man that I look up to quite a bit, he’s always told me or told all my brothers and myself that it’s important for you to pray for your spouse, to pray for your partner. I’m probably the only one that took it seriously. Maybe a little bit stupid, but I remember when I was 12, I would just do it maybe out of tradition. When Rossana came to my life, I was convinced that it came from God. I was.

Arkitektura:
I do love that. When you say pray for your partner, what I initially thought it meant is pray that your partner do well, but you mean pray for a partner?

Lyndon Neri:
Pray for a partner.

Arkitektura:
Pray for a partner that’s a good fit for you.

Lyndon Neri:
To know that a higher being out there knows what is best for you. You might not necessarily see it. No. God will provide. Rossana was interesting because Rossana was almost exactly opposite from me. We’re actually interested in many things together with the exception of maybe she’s fanatical with music and I’m into sports. That’s probably the only two things that we’re quite different. Everything else from art to architecture, to food, to theater, to shopping I think, to fashion, I think we’re very similar that way. Rossana’s very calm. Rossana looks serious, but she doesn’t have a temper, which is amazing because I’m always smiling.

Rossana Hu:
You’re fiery.

Lyndon Neri:
I’m a fiery temperamental individual, which is actually dangerous. Rossana’s extremely logical and I’m very emotional. Rossana tends to design by thinking. I tend to design by making or drawing. Not that she can’t draw because she can. She draws beautifully. I would like to think I can think as well, but definitely that is her strength. She’s very composed. Nothing faze Rossana. I love that about her. I love that logical. There’s that child-like innocence in Rossana, but I think most importantly knowing that she’s from God. I had to take good care of her because it’s a gift. It’s a gift. It’s not something that we call in Chinese culture. It’s naturally mine. I don’t have the term, but …

Arkitektura:
Yes, I understand.

Rossana Hu:
Entitlement.

Lyndon Neri:
Entitlement. There’s no sense of entitlement. Thank you, Rossana. I know that it’s precious. It’s a gift. We’ve been married. This year is our 25th year. We dated for six years before our marriage, so we’ve been together 31 years.

Arkitektura:
Wow.

Lyndon Neri:
Without Rossana, there will be no Neri&Hu.

Arkitektura:
Without you, there’d be no …

Lyndon Neri:
Probably.

Arkitektura:
I’m going to ask the same thing of you just because it’s this wonderful romantic moment.

Rossana Hu:
I think like Lyndon said, we are similar yet different. The similarities make us stronger and the differences make us closer. At work and at home, those qualities sometimes shift in strange ways. For example, at work Lyndon is the spas. He’s everywhere. He never shows up on time. His assistant has the worst job because she’s trying to get him to show up in meetings and answer his emails. She can’t get him to do anything according to her schedule and I’m the one who is very, very kind of rigid about …

Arkitektura:
Structured.

Rossana Hu:
Structured and system and operational flow, but then at home, in our personal lives and sort of our emotional lives, we’re kind of the opposite. Lyndon has from day one since I met him he’s emotionally stable. He knows what he wants and this is it. It’s like one day and forever is the same for him. I am just this up and down. I can be all over the place. I never know what I want, and I’m shifting 10,000 times a day. It’s kind of strange, but after all these years, we’ve had our chance to analyze and then appreciate both the differences and the similarities and take joy in both.

It’s quite I think special and unique and I think also that we work together because we have a lot of friends who are close couples, and they say, “Oh, we can never work together because it takes a special kind of relationship.” For us, it’s probably just the opposite. I don’t think we would be able to have this career without one another because the kind of support you need in a design firm, a partner of a design firm, has to be one that has complete trust. I’m not just talking about business terms, but also sensibilities and how do you design decisions, which projects you take and all those things. Because of the trust, it just makes things move much faster and smoothly. It’s just all worked out very well and then the kids.

You have to make major decisions about how to nurture them, where they go to school. Just a lot of kind of life big decisions. We see eye to eye on a lot of issues.

Arkitektura:
Let’s talk a little bit about them just because I’m curious. I imagine they’re incredibly proud of you.

Lyndon Neri:
Good question.

Rossana Hu:
We don’t know about that.

Lyndon Neri:
We don’t know about that.

Rossana Hu:
Because we never really talked to them about this. Their growing up experience is very part of the establishment of the firm. I never thought of it that way, but it’s absolutely true that our son … When we first went to Shanghai, our oldest was five, the second was three and the youngest was four months old. We opened the office a year after. I kind of what to say that they really supported us through this whole tumultuous 13, 14 years and particularly the first three to five years. They were very young and they had to put up with a lot of difficulties, not seeing us or coming to the office with us on weekends. We bring them to client meetings and they’re like sitting in the corner.

Lyndon Neri:
Having a house that’s constantly being renovated. This is probably our third or four now.

Arkitektura:
I’m sure.

Rossana Hu:
Traveling with us. We take them everywhere. Our kids are extremely well traveled.

Lyndon Neri:
We would take them out of school just so that they could be with us.

Rossana Hu:
Especially when they’re younger, we used to say, “Oh, you know what? I think they’ll learn more coming to Sri Lanka with us.” The heck with school. We’ll just take two weeks off school. We hope that kind of growing up experience has given them a unique outlook in life.

Arkitektura:
I love hearing about your children and I’m sure they must … I mean I think it’s a wonderful experience for your child to see the process of building something that you’re passionate about and what it takes. Coming to the meetings, I know my mom built her law practice while I was growing up. I was with her when she was studying for the bar. She would pretend to give me like the multiple choice questions. I would answer what I’ve done.

Rossana Hu:
You should have gone to law school.

Arkitektura:
She would have loved for me to. Then opening up her practice and everything. It fosters a tremendous amount of pride I think in seeing that your parents and built this and what it takes and their passion for it and the fact that you made them part of it in so many ways because they are obviously part of it. I was thinking about your own parents. I wondered if it was challenging way in any way for you or for them that you went into a creative field, even though you excelled so exceptionally in that field I mean just right off the bat from your education.

I know for me even as a journalist coming from an immigrant family, they probably would have liked something more traditional, doctor, lawyer, even an accountant. Very similar. Why do you have to choose journalism?

Rossana Hu:
What do you do actually?

Arkitektura:
What do you do?

Rossana Hu:
I get that a lot.

Arkitektura:
Even still with the actual tangible quality of the buildings or objects.

Rossana Hu
Yeah. Because they’re not … With all Chinese parents, for them it’s almost like career path. There are only those few. I have two older siblings. In a way I’m blessed because they kind of fulfilled the engineering path. They both studied engineering and then worked as engineers. I was about to follow that path. I was great in math and science and it was easy path for me. That’s why it was crucial I think when I decided to go to Berkeley. I think I could have picked any major. I thought, “Oh, architecture. I’m kind of interested in design. I think I have some talent. I’m good in math and science. Why don’t I try architecture,” because it seemed to be at the time naively a perfect marriage of the arts and science.

Luckily I consulted Lyndon and he made me even more kind of interested in something that just looked so fun and meaningful. For my parents, I think definitely it was not an easy thing to allow me to just carve out my own path, but I have to say I’m very thankful that they never gave me any pressure. I never felt any pressure. They never had any criticism even early on. Early on meaning we had no idea if I was going to even find a job after I graduated, but they never criticized like, “Oh, you know, why aren’t you in a field that will give you more money when you graduate?” They have never criticized in that matter, whereas I think I have a lot of friends who felt that kind of pressure from their Asian parents.

Arkitektura:
I’m sure. Yeah.

Rossana Hu:
I have to say they’ve given me complete freedom in choosing what I wanted to do.

Arkitektura:
It’s wonderful and obviously you’ve done the same with your own children. Lyndon, you were saying how much you admire your father. Sometimes we talk about heroes. Would you say he is a hero of yours?

Lyndon Neri:
I would, yes.

Arkitektura:
What are the things that …

Lyndon Neri:
He was a very successful businessman. He was also extremely dictatorial. If he heard us, he’ll probably be surprised, but he is. He’s very dominant.

Arkitektura:
You can feel it right away when you meet him?

Lyndon Neri:
Oh yeah. In fact, he has such a stern face. Even though he has a warm heart, he’s not like my mom. My mom’s extremely friendly and warm initially when you see her. It takes a while to get to know my father. They had expectations. My father had expectations and also has a certain mandate for all his kids. My brother was supposed to be a lawyer. I was supposed to be an engineer and it just goes on. He sort of has a small company that he’s setting up wherein everyone was going to be taking care and all these professionals were going to come together and help him build his empire. I was that engineer just because I was good in math. Unlike my brothers who either tried to follow what my father had wanted …

In fact, my older was not law, it was economics. It was my third brother that my father wanted to be a lawyer. They did it, but they fought every bit of it. I just lied. I just said, “Yes, I am. I’m going to Berkeley. I’m going to be a mechanical engineer.” He was in the Philippines at that time.

Arkitektura:
You didn’t tell him that you’re taking architecture?

Lyndon Neri:
Of course, not. I was not studying architecture. I was painting because that was my first love. I actually love to paint. In many ways, I was an art major. I still remember my first year at Berkeley I was literally painting. During that time, you had Manuel Neri. You had Joan Brown here in the Bay Area. It was an amazing place and it was liberating. My father didn’t really know the whole story because when he came … By the time he came and he found out that I was studying architecture, real estate in the ’80s was not. He thought that architecture was real estate. He said, “Well, a clever son. He’ll make money.”

I just made it blurry. You just have to make it blurry. In life sometimes you don’t have to explain everything.

Arkitektura:
That’s right.

Lyndon Neri:
I just led him to believe what he wants to believe. Our relationship was okay if you do that. Obviously going to the GSD helped. Going to Harvard made him realize that, “Okay. He’s serious or he’s … At least within his peers, I think he’s taking it seriously.” It was not until maybe four years ago when we were inducted into the Hall of Fame in New York City when we were presented the … Cindy, the presenter, then mentioned this fact. I turned to my dad, I say, “I guess you know the truth now. I was painting all this time.”

Arkitektura:
They were there at the …

Lyndon Neri:
They were there. They were there.

Arkitektura:
Did your parents come to?

Rossana Hu:
Yeah. We invited both.

Lyndon Neri:
That was a wonderful time.

Arkitektura:
That must have been wonderful because they’re not in the design field. They have really no idea what we do and I think it was the … During the induction, they had pre-made a film about our work. I think that’s probably one of the first times that they understood what we did.

Rossana Hu:
It’s amazing.

Arkitektura:
That must have been such a great moment for you for them to all be there. Would you say that was the pinnacle? I mean if you were to think of let’s say the three top moments of your career up to this point.

Rossana Hu:
Career wise yes. I think that’s one of them because that’s kind of one moment where also our families shared our stories behind our career. We’re very thankful where we are. We are very thankful for all the “accomplishments and awards and honors” that we received. We try to balance that with just also constantly being critical of our work.

Arkitektura:
I think we need to be because we are very fearful that we will be complacent and then just start to become a firm that churns out the same thing over and over just because it’s tried and true and people like it. You start to satisfy your own desire to fulfill other people’s expectation. I think we’re very mindful of that.

Rossana Hu:
I think that’s the challenge for most creatives is once you’ve done something well, how do you find ways to not do it in that way again. Not to not do it in that way again, but to not stick to only that way.

Lyndon Neri:
It’s helpful that we’re doing many things. In the product design world, sometimes they don’t know of our architectural world or work or interior design work. The interior design world knows of our interior work. Sometimes do not know of our architectural work and/or our product design work. We also do publication and things of that sort. It’s interesting because for a long time we were always emerging in many different … We’re emerging architecture, emerging interior designer, emerging product designer. I think naturally because we don’t have time for one particular discipline. We were constantly doing many things and that was not intentional either.

We went to China and we realized if it is up to druthers, we would probably focus on architecture, but there was no work for us. We were young and the big projects were given to international practices. We were neither the star architects or the local architects. We were just this diasporic Chinese that’s neither foreign nor Chinese. We started doing cups, spoon, forks.

Rossana Hu:
Furniture.

Lyndon Neri:
Furniture. We dabbled on that. Of course, that’s also our experience at Michael Graves, but after six months we started doing interior design and it was not until like five years into our practice that we did architecture. We’re doing many things and we also do graphic design. It was not because we want to do that per se, but there was a lack of consultant in the city where we’re practicing. Naturally when clients wants to hire graphic designers that were not that good, we said, “Wow. This is going to ruin our building, so why don’t we just do it? Why don’t we just do the furniture because buying them from abroad would be very expensive?”

At the same time we had another enterprise called Design Republic and that’s different from Neri&Hu Design and Research Office. We are not business people per se, but that in itself is a retail business. We had to do it because that was a way for us to educate our client, a way to bring design to the masses and show them that modern design is relevant. You can imagine we’re trying to juggle all these different things.

Arkitektura:
Out of necessity.

Lyndon Neri:
Out of necessity.

Rossana Hu:
Exactly.

Lyndon Neri:
Because of that, I think we’re always emerging in many fronts. I think we’re never quite there yet. We’re far from being mature in architecture or even interior design or product design. In fact, last year in Milan we won the EDIDA Design of the Year. Probably among product designers, that’s probably the highest award in product design. Rossana and I were quite shocked when we got it. We really were. That award belongs to people like Jasper Morrison, the Bouroullec Brothers, the Grcic. We have no business to be even mentioned in that category, but we’re fortunate enough to be given that platform, to be able to experiment. Through time people took notice. It’s just the beginning for product design.

People always say after you win the EDIDA Award, that’s when most of the commission starts coming in.

Arkitektura:
Amazing.

Lyndon Neri:
It’s a journey.

Arkitektura:
It’s good to be emerging.

Lyndon Neri:
It’s good to be emerging all the time. Yeah.

Arkitektura:
It is. It’s wonderful to be mature, but it’s wonderful to be emerging to maturity ultimately.

Rossana Hu:
True.

Arkitektura:
Given that there are all these different disciplines, is there a through line? If you were to characterize the through line amongst it all?

Rossana Hu:
Yeah.

Lyndon Neri:
Yeah. We never get asked this question.

Arkitektura:
What would you say is the consistency in vision whether it be a publication to a building from something so tangible as a spoon?

Lyndon Neri:
I think we go back to that quote by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. “We do not aspire to be eternal beings, but we hope that things do not lose its meaning.” I think all the things we do is not so much stylistic, the projects we’re working on be it Waterhouse or Sulwhasoo. Stylistic is so different, but the essence of it, there’s always meaning to everything we do.

Rossana Hu:
I would say we always try to engage culture, certain aspect of culture. This brings me back to almost your first question about our background. I think you have said how you’ll talk about our work and how they relate and they actually do because very early on when we started to have time to reflect about our work and also not so much strategize, but think about what are the issues we want to explore, what do we want to spend more time on, how do we want to engage our work with things that we’re passionate about, culture really stood out and identity. I think what we do speaks to a generation of people who are searching for who they are. In many ways, I’ve actually never articulated it this way, but I think it’s true that Lyndon and I use our work to find ourselves.

Because objects are this … It takes on concrete form and material and yet they in an abstract way solidify thoughts and philosophy. It’s like concretizing things that are not so tangible. In that process of thinking, taking thought and giving it shape and then a spatial kind of experience leading people through it, I think that process is how we also define our identity. Somehow I’m thinking it’s resonated with the people who like our work because maybe through engaging our work they also find a way to find their own identity. That identity could be many facets. Sometimes it’s cultural or national the way that we engage in questions of what is Chineseness? How do you make an object or a teacup visually Chinese? Experientially Chinese?

Is it important to have a teacup that holds Chinese tea to have emblems that are Chinese? What is culture and how do you define culture? How do you exhibit culture? How do you represent culture? Like all these things are I think what a lot of people are going through right now.

Arkitektura:
Very much so. I think when you’re faced with something, whatever it might be, an object, a building, a place that opens the opportunity for you to better explore your own sense of place and identity without giving the answer, I think that’s really successful. One of the things I read about your work and this is not an exact quote, but it was about how beauty … What is beauty? It’s not necessarily that which is beautiful.

Lyndon Neri:
In fact, when Waterhouse opened, I remember Rossana’s parents went.

Rossana Hu:
Yeah, I remember this.

Lyndon Neri:
Her mother couldn’t stop laughing. Obviously it’s stimulated a certain sense of humor. She just keeps laughing and laughing and laughing and laughing and the father goes, “Is this done?” My parents had the same reaction, except my father had some ideas and said, “You know son, whatever you do, if you can convince people, that’s pretty amazing. You’re either super brilliant or really crazy.” It definitely makes people think. It’s important for us when we design spaces or objects that it stimulate this questioning. I always think that when a building forces you to see subtle things as you stay in a place or when you go back and you find layers and layers of things that you have not seen before, then I think it’s quite successful.

I remember Michael Speaks, the dean at Syracuse University, as he was introducing us last week when we gave the Mark Robins lecture in New York City. He says, “As beautiful as those drawings are and as beautiful as those pictures that they have shown you and they have also shown you film, it’s not as good as in real life.” That to me was probably one of the biggest compliment coming from an architect.

Arkitektura:
I did love that about your mom coming in and just being like, “I thought this was done. What is this?”

Rossana Hu:
It’s a construction site.

Arkitektura:
To show the heritage of a place, it adds such a depth.

Lyndon Neri:
There are memories to buildings. Rossana and I take a very strong stand especially in the city where we’re practicing. People think just by demolishing building that they can just start from ground zero. The alleyways that the children are playing, they have memories. Spaces have memories. Buildings have memories. You don’t just take them down because they’re old or they’re not relevant anymore. There are certain typology that could be inserted. The word adaptive reuse. I want to always coin another term because it’s overused, but I can’t really because it’s a very good word. Just because when we get older, you don’t just say, “Well, your past 50. You’re not relevant anymore.”

There is something to be said about people who have gone through buildings, who have gone through something. Just because it’s old, just because it has heritage … Well, because it’s old it has heritage. Therefore, it’s important.

Arkitektura:
You’re all the more valuable because of your age.

Lyndon Neri:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Arkitektura:
That was the dynamic design duo Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu. To learn more about their work, just look Neri&Hu. There’s so much to see. Design in Mind is a podcast series from Arkitektura. Based in San Francisco, Arkitektura curates the best designs from around the world and makes it accessible through its retail spaces, live events and this podcast. Design in Mind is Arkitektura’s way of honoring the life and work of some of the best designers today and celebrating the magic and beauty of design and design thinking. Design in Mind is produced for our Arkitektura by Sound Made Public. I’m your host Tania Ketenjian and our associate producer is Zeneva Schindler.

To hear more, please visit arksf.com or go to iTunes and subscribe to Design in Mind. Rate the show and tell us what you think. Thanks so much for listening.